International Sugar Journal

Light-dependent enzyme promotes drop-in fuels production from cellulosic feedstock [Full subscriber]

Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have succeeded in producing drop-in fuel from lignocellulosic feedstock.

Read more …

Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum produces high yield of glutaric acid [Registered]

Researchers at the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain capable of producing a high yield of the platform chemical glutaric acid without by-products from glucose.

Read more …

Yeast metabolically engineered to synthesis triterpenoid saponins [Full subscriber]

Researchers at Osaka University, in collaboration with the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), RIKEN, and Chiba University have discovered a vital link in the complex biochemical pathway for saponin synthesis. Their discovery paves the way for improving the commercial production of these high-value products.

Read more …

Speeding up metabolic engineering with machine learning [Full subscriber]

Synthetic biology allows us to bioengineer cells to synthesize novel valuable molecules such as renewable biofuels or anticancer drugs. However, traditional synthetic biology approaches involve ad-hoc engineering practices, which lead to long development times. Now, researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have created a new tool that adapts machine learning algorithms to the needs of synthetic biology, dramatically reducing the time spent engineering drugs and chemicals.

Read more …

Bioengineering plants to turn them into biofactories for new molecules [Full subscriber]

Plants can produce a wide range of molecules, many of which help them fight off harmful pests and pathogens. Biologists have harnessed this ability to produce many molecules important for human health — aspirin and the antimalarial drug artemisinin, for example, are derived from plants. Now, researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and Stanford University have designed and engineered new synthetic metabolic pathways to create new-to-nature biopesticides with novel anti-fungal activity.

Read more …

Yeast metabolically engineered to produce the medicinal tropane alkaloids [Full subscriber]

Researchers at Stanford University report the first successful microbial biosynthesis of the tropane alkaloids hyoscyamine and scopolamine, a class of neuromuscular blockers naturally found in plants in the nightshade family.

Read more …

E. coli engineered to produce adipic acid from guaiacol [Full subscriber]

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have engineered E. coli to produce the platform chemical adipic acid used in nylon manufacturing.

Read more …

E. coli engineered to fully exploit cellulosic sugars to produce muconic acid [Full subscriber]

researchers at Kobe University, Japan have developed .a new strategy called Parallel Metabolic Pathway Engineering (PMPE), allowing them to fully exploit both sugars for target chemical production and microbe propagation. They used this approach to alter E. coli bacteria in order to successfully boost the production of the nylon precursor muconic acid.

Read more …

E. coli metabolically rewired to consume CO2 and produce various by-products [Full subscriber]

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have engineered Escherichia coli that consume just CO2 as their nutrient source, instead of organic compounds. This breakthrough could provide a foundation for harnessing synthetic biology to develop carbon-neutral bioproduction processes for food and fuels.

Read more …

Cyanobacterium metabolically engineered to produce astaxanthin [Full subscriber]

Researchers at Kobe University’s Engineering Biology Research Centre have succeeded in synthesizing astaxanthin using the fast-growing marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

Read more …