International Sugar Journal

Biosynthesis of anthocyanins using E. coli polycultures fed sugar [Registered]

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have shown that four strains of E. coli bacteria working together can convert sugar into the natural red anthocyanin pigment found in strawberries.

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Korean researchers engineer E. coli to produce terephthalic acid [Registered]

Researchers from the The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have developed an efficient biocatalytic system to produce terephthalic acid (TPA) from p-xylene (pX) via bioengineered Escherichia coli.

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E. coli engineered to produce sugar from carbon dioxide [Registered]

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute have partially succeeded inserting the metabolic pathway for carbon fixation and sugar production (the so called Calvin cycle) into the bacterium E. coli, a known “consumer” organism that eats sugar and releases carbon dioxide.

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Engineered E. coli strain produces jet fuel from cellulosic feedstock [Registered]

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have engineered a strain of Escherichia coli that enables a “one-pot” method for producing advanced biofuels from a slurry of pre-treated plant material.

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E. coli engineered to produce morphine precursor [Registered]

“Morphine has a complex molecular structure; because of this, the production of morphine and similar painkillers is expensive and time-consuming,” said the lead researcher Fumihiko Sato of Kyoto University. “But with our E. coli, we were able to yield 2.1 miligrams of thebaine in a matter of days from roughly 20 grams of sugar, as opposed to 0.0064 mg with yeast.”

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E. coli metabolically engineered to produce 1,3-diaminopropane from sugar [Registered]

1,3-DAP is a three carbon diamine, which has a wide range of industrial applications including epoxy resin and cross-linking agents, as well as precursors for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and organic chemicals. It can also be polymerized with dicarboxylic acids to make polyamides (nylons) for use as engineering plastics, medical materials, and adhesives. Traditionally, 1,3-DAP is derived from petroleum-based processes. Researchers claim that they are the first to produce 1,3-DAP from plant sugar.

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