International Sugar Journal

Engineered E. coli has the potential to produce fuel and chemicals from CO2 [Full subscriber]

Researchers from Newcastle University, UK, have engineered Escherichia coli bacteria to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) using hydrogen gas (H2) to convert it into formic acid. The research raises the possibility of converting atmospheric CO2 to commodity chemicals.

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CAZYmes from Trichoderma harzianum have potential for cellulosic biofuels production [Full subscriber]

Researchers at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in Brazil have found an enzyme from the Amazon fungus Trichoderma harzianum to be capable of breaking down biomass into sugars for subsequent fermentation into biofuels and chemicals.

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E. coli engineered to synthesise chondroitin sulfate [Full subscriber]

Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a class of important biologics that are currently manufactured by extraction from animal tissues. Although such methods are unsustainable and prone to contamination, animal-free production methods have not emerged as competitive alternatives due to complexities in scale-up, the requirement for multiple stages and the cost of co-factors and purification. Now, researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, US have developed one-step biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate (CS), a type of GAG, a polysaccharide molecule used in pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals, via reprogrammed E. coli.

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E. coli engineered to produce adipic acid from guaiacol [Full subscriber]

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have engineered E. coli to produce the platform chemical adipic acid used in nylon manufacturing.

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E. coli engineered to fully exploit cellulosic sugars to produce muconic acid [Full subscriber]

researchers at Kobe University, Japan have developed .a new strategy called Parallel Metabolic Pathway Engineering (PMPE), allowing them to fully exploit both sugars for target chemical production and microbe propagation. They used this approach to alter E. coli bacteria in order to successfully boost the production of the nylon precursor muconic acid.

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E. coli metabolically rewired to consume CO2 and produce various by-products [Full subscriber]

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have engineered Escherichia coli that consume just CO2 as their nutrient source, instead of organic compounds. This breakthrough could provide a foundation for harnessing synthetic biology to develop carbon-neutral bioproduction processes for food and fuels.

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Customising engineered microbes to improve the economics of cellulosic biofuels production [Registered]

Scientists at the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have demonstrated a method to insert genes into a variety of microorganisms that previously would not accept foreign DNA, with the goal of creating custom microbes to break down lignocellulosic feedstocks into cellulosic sugars and subsequently ferment them. Dubbed “consolidated bioprocessing” (CBP), this approach improves the economics of biofuels production.

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E. coli bioengineered to produce super strong spider silk [Full subscriber]

Scientists at the Washington University in St. Louis have bioengineered E. coli found to produce super-strong spider dragline silk.

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E. coli engineered to synthesise terpenes [Registered]

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in bioengineered E. coli.

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Lignin to chemicals facilitated by metabolically engineered E. coli [Full subscriber]

Researchers at the Sandia National Laboratories in California have demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from lignin.

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