International Sugar Journal

Regulating bacteria’s metabolism could pave way for increased biofuel production [Full subscriber]

Researchers at University of California Riverside (UCR) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have used mathematical and computational modelling, artificial intelligence algorithms and experiments showing that bacteria have failsafe mechanisms preventing them from producing too many metabolic intermediates.

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Global ‘soil atlas’ reveals handful of bacteria dominate the Earth’s soil [Registered]

Soil bacteria play key roles in regulating terrestrial carbon dynamics, nutrient cycles, and plant productivity. However, the natural histories and distributions of these organisms remain largely undocumented. An extensive study by an international team of researchers has found that only a small percentage of bacterial species are both common and abundant in soils around the world.

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Researchers engineer metabolic pathways of several bacteria to produce drop-in fuel [Registered]

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a novel way to produce biofuel by stitching together the best bits of several different bacteria.

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Cyborg bacteria effective in producing useful chemicals from sunlight [Registered]

Researchers at the University of California Berkeley may have introduced a new era in artificial photosynthesis. They’ve devised a way to cover bacteria with cadmium sulphide semiconductor nanocrystals to breakdown CO2 into acetic acid, a potential feedstock for biosynthesis of fuels and plastics.

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Scientists engineer bacterial enzyme to forge carbon-silicon bond [Registered]

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have succeeded in modifying bacterial proteins them into powerful enzymes capable of producing silicon-carbon compounds naturally and more efficiently than manmade catalysts.

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Hydrogen biofuel “nano-reactor” created from bacteria and viruses [Registered]

The researchers developed “P22-Hyd” by modifying an enzyme and placing it within a protective protein shell, a “capsid”, from a bacterial virus. The strengthened biological catalyst is 150 times more efficient than the original enzyme.

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Bacterium Moorella thermoacetica tricked to “photosynthesise” chemicals [Registered]

The scientists have found a way to incorporate the bacterium into a hybrid artificial photosynthesis system capable of synthesizing valuable chemical products. Researchers gifted the bacterium light-harvesting powers by integrating cadmium sulfide nanoparticles.

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E. coli and Paenibacillus vortex partnered to hydrolyse cellulosic feedstock [Registered]

Cellulose is one of the hardest polysaccharide to hydrolyze. Currently, the conversion of cellulosic materials to renewable energy includes either chemical or biological hydrolysis followed by fermentation of sugars to biofuels. Utility cost of biological- enzymatic hydrolysis is low compared to chemical hydrolysis since it is usually conducted at mild conditions and does not have a corrosion problem. Biological hydrolysis is usually carried out in liquid. However, Solid State hydrolysis is financially feasible due to lower capital investment and lower operating expenses. Most cellulolytic bacteria are anaerobes with a very low growth rate and low enzyme titers.

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Tecnalia partners with Kereon to advance its biobased rubber process [Registered]

1,3-butadiene is best-known for its use in the production of rubber to manufacture tyres. It is also used as the basis for producing everyday products, such as raincoats, footwear and casings for electronic equipment. The global market for 1,3 butadiene is expected to reach US$ 33.01 billion by 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research.

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Discovery of bacterial biofilm paves way to improved crop protection [Registered]

Researchers have discovered how communities of beneficial bacteria form a waterproof coating on the roots of plants, to protect them from microbes that could potentially cause plant disease.

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