International Sugar Journal
The Blackboard

Post-harvest cane deterioration [Full subscriber]

In 1959 Vallance & Young, commenting on the introduction of chopper harvesters, noted that billets (BI) would deteriorate faster than whole stalk (WS) cane between harvesting and milling because of the increased number of cut ends; these would intensify sugar losses due to fermentation and to increased respiration

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Extraneous matter (EM) and processing [Registered]

The impact of EM on processing has been investigated extensively. In 1949 (Anon.1) the disadvantages to factory work caused by excessive quantities of EM in cane were discussed at length. Trash decreased sucrose (S) in total cane, increased the fibre content, and decreased the Java Ratio which affected cane payment.

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The Blackboard

Extraneous matter (EM) in cane [Full subscriber]

EM in sugarcane can be of vegetable or mineral nature. The former includes immature tops, green/dry leaves, sheaths, side shoots and suckers; the minerals consist mainly of soil/sand present in the harvested cane. In the past all the EM in sugarcane was viewed as a problem with negative effects during harvesting, loading and transporting of the cane and on processing through reduced throughputs, poor boiler operation, sucrose losses and poor sugar quality.

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Acid beverage floc (ABF) [Registered]

ABF, a flocculated turbid material that sometimes appears on standing in carbonated, acidified and sweetened beverages, causes severe commercial problems both in soft drinks and in acidic pharmaceutical syrups, although […]

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The sucrose crystal: Effect on processing [Full subscriber]

Investigating the form and shape of sucrose (S) crystals started in 1843; remarkable results were published by Kucharenko and Phelps in 1928 and 1932 (Powers, 1969-1970). In 1959 Powers mentioned […]

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The Blackboard

The sucrose crystal: Fundamentals [Registered]

One of the main objectives of the sugar industry is to produce large quantities of crystalline sugar of high purity, at a commercially acceptable price. This is possible because sucrose […]

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Filtration of clarifier muds in raw sugar factories [Registered]

The clarification process in cane sugar factories yields clear juice which moves forwards to the process and an underflow called mud. The mud contains non-sucrose species precipitated through the action of heat and lime; as it settles slowly the precipitate traps, and therefore removes, suspended matter in the supernatant juice.

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Cane maturity testing [Registered]

In 1935 ISSCT held a symposium on methods to determine the maturity of sugarcane; a presentation from Nath & Kasinath gives references from work done in 1915 and 1916 in Malaysia and India. Kerr (1935) describes a method based on randomly sampling 10 stalks which were then divided into three equal lengths, namely top (Tp), middle (Mi) and bottom (Bo);

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Sugarcane breeding: Conclusions [Registered]

Breeding work has been published regularly in cane sugar literature, often by the same author over many years. H H Dodds for example published 7 papers from 1926 to 1944 and P G C Brett 6 from 1947 to 1957, in SASTA proceedings. In Australia J H Buzacott, K R Gard, M K Butterfield, D M Hogarth & N Berding and M C Cox et al published from 1950 to 2014.

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Sugarcane breeding: Early history [Registered]

The industry does not “make” sugar: it extracts it from sugarcane; the wellbeing and quality of this plant are therefore critical for commercial ventures to survive. If the climate and […]

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